South Sudan’s Seemingly Unending War

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July 2011 to become an independent, sovereign nation. However two years later, in December 2013, disagreements between two former rebel leaders Riek Machar and President Salvar Kirr plunged the nation into what would become a seemingly unending civil war. South Sudan has two main sides of political divide: SPLM,…

Armenia: The Road to Democracy in Post-Soviet Caucasus

A Crisis in Armenia: The Fight for Democracy Recently, the mountainous former Soviet nation of Armenia has been heavily featured on mainstream media, mainly due to the country’s wave of protests against its now former prime minister, Serzh Sargsyan, led by the opposition’s leader, Nikol Pashinyan. The protests, which Mr Pashinyan said a “non-violent velvet revolution”, reacted…

The Failure of an International Commitment to Human Rights

Middle Eastern political analyst Emile Hokayem recently tweeted “Being from, caring about and working on the Middle East is an endless heartbreak,” in reference to reports of the use of chemical weapons in Douma, Syria, on April 7th, 2018. When I first learned that a player in the Syrian conflict, presumably the Assad government, orchestrated…

Cuba’s Government is Changing: What’s Next?

On April 19, 2018, Miguel Diaz-Canel was selected President of Cuba by the National Assembly of People’s Power, which held its most recent election of representatives on March 11. According to Granma, Cuba’s national news source, over 85% of eligible voters cast ballots in the election, with 94% of them being valid. Telesur, a media…

Mattis Visits Southeast Asia: Strengthening the US Indo-Pacific Strategy

Last year U.S. President Donald Trump has frequently stated the term “free and open Indo-Pacific” during his Asia voyage, as this month U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has visited Southeast Asia to Indonesia and Vietnam in an effort to reach a consensus in defense issues and forge strong new partnerships. The Indo-Pacific policy aims to…

What is this so-called Wind of Change in South Africa?

The power of incumbency is such a hot topic for political debate in Africa. A sitting African president appearing on national TV, not for any other purpose, but to read out a resignation speech, is typically not an African thing. But when this happens, like we recently witnessed in South Africa, how should we tell…

Iranians Demand Change in Large Displays of Protest and Activism

Iran was struck by waves of anti-government and pro-government rallies during a period spanning the end of December 2017 and the beginning of January 2018. The anti-government demonstrators were drawn to action as a result of the rising prices of basic goods (specifically eggs and poultry), alleged corruption, lack of personal freedom and the country’s…

Millions in the Line of Fire: The Responsibility to Protect in Yemen

In Yemen, the poorest country in the Middle East, there has been a civil war raging since Houthis rebels took over the country’s capital in 2014. After the president was ousted in 2011, the country became unstable and progressed towards war. With the Houthis being ideologically opposed to many of Yemen’s neighbors, the surrounding countries…

Saudi’s Split Personality Disorder: The Cholera Resurgence

The widespread devastation left by AIDS in the last 20 years has been horrifying, with the syndrome having swept mercilessly across Africa and claiming no less than 35 million lives to date. But the world has been forced to turn its attention to an equally contagious infection that was something of a dark horse, creeping…

United Nations: High level is important, but so is Ground level

The high-level scene, a strategic answer for the global sustainability? With less than 5000 days left to achieve the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) took place in New York from July 10 to July 19, “convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council.” The theme…

The Trump Presidency in Numbers

It has been six months into Trump’s presidency and the American people are starting to feel “great again”. A Bloomberg poll concluded that despite only 40 percent of Americans approve of the job they’re doing, they are feeling better about themselves, their financial and economic prospects. If Trump’s reading this, it should be a good…

What Happened to “Never Again”? The Withdrawal of Peacekeepers in Darfur

             Amidst the war-torn and ravaged Darfur, a region that has not seen peace or stability in over a decade, United Nations peacekeepers protect civilians from the violence that surrounds them.  Members of UNAMID, or the African Union/United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur, symbolize security and humanitarian aid, while also facilitating discussion regarding new agreements and…

The Sharif Factor: Pakistan’s future

Following the 2016 Panama Papers leak, it was revealed that the Prime Minister of Pakistan and his family held offshore bank accounts in order to avoid taxation. Although Nawaz Sharif consistently denied any wrongdoing, five judges in the Pakistani Supreme Court unanimously agreed on a guilty verdict, on July 28th, 2017. Overall, the Supreme Court…

The Venezuela Vote: What Happens Next?

Venezuelans are about to make a pivotal decision: fully embrace the authoritarian doctrine of President Nicolas Maduro and his current communist regime? Or fight for a chance at change and political freedom? On July 30th, citizens will cast their vote regarding a redrafting of their national constitution. President Nicolas Maduro has ordered a 545-member constituent assembly by…

The Schengen Agreement: The Undiscussed Policy Behind EU Immigration and Brexit

Cries of a crumbling Europe are being heard worldwide. Today, some are suggesting the EU should be disenfranchised because of a disagreement with the European Union’s immigration policies. Brexit presented open immigration policies as an issue with European Union membership, and many across the channel are beginning to agree. But what is the European Union?…

CSIS Sued for Discrimination

The CSIS have been sued for workplace misconduct against the employees for up to $35 Million Dollars. The allegation stems from 5 employees who claim that the CSIS supervisors encourage discriminatory behaviours which they describe as  Islamophobic, racist and homophobic. In the statement of claim, the plaintiffs state the breach of their rights under the Canadian Right…

The state of Venezuela in 2017

On Sunday July 17th, the Venezuelan opposition groups held an unofficial referendum across the country to demonstrate that the people want change from Nicolás Maduro’s current regime. In spite of the government’s condemnation of this referendum, approximately 7 million people out of the 17 million qualified to vote cast their ballots. More importantly, 98% of…

Bioterrorism: ISIS’ next venture

She is known as “Lady Al-Qaeda”. An MIT-trained neuroscientist, The Taliban and Daesh wanted her so badly, that they were willing to trade their prisoners for her. Her name is Aafia Siddiqui and she was, at one point, the most wanted woman in the world. After news broke out that ISIS was willing to trade…

Germany and India: Bilateral relations in a nutshell

Bilateral relations between India and Germany are founded on common democratic principles and are marked by a high degree of trust and mutual respect. India was among the first countries to establish diplomatic ties with the Federal Republic of Germany after the Second World War. Relations grew significantly following the end of the Cold War and the reunification of…

The Effect of Canadian Mining in Latin America and the Caribbean

Justin Trudeau has made a commitment to fighting climate change and human rights violations both locally and abroad. Locally, Justin Trudeau held a conference with all provincial and territorial leaders in 2016 to create an action plan to transition towards a low-carbon economy. He has also welcomed Syrian refugees and has attempted to address Aboriginal…

Reflecting on the Conference on Cyprus: A unique opportunity jettisoned

“I am deeply sorry to inform you that, despite the very strong commitment and the engagement of all the delegations and the different parties, the Greek and Turkish Cypriot delegations, Greece, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the European Union, as an observer, and, of course, the United Nations team, the Conference on Cyprus was closed…

The Phony Seat: Canada’s “rise” to the Security Council

When it comes to promoting international stability, Canada is not a country to scoff at. Since its inception in the October of 1945, Canada has enthusiastically supported the United Nation’s vision of collective security, preventing conflict of the likes associated with the Second World War. But the country’s indisputable generosity continues to suffer a phantom…

Decoding the Populist Wave

By now, it is established wisdom that the age of globalization is coming towards an end and is being replaced with hardliner policies- much of which adhere to protectionism and other populist movements.  These policies have significantly altered the current political landscape as we know it. Showing first signs in the Brexit vote and then…